How does steinbeck present the lives

However, Candy is disabled as well because he only has one hand. The bunkhouse is a building that provides temporary shelter during the night for those working on the ranch.

In Of Mice and Men, how does Steinbeck present the lives of the workers on the ranch?

Her relationship with her husband, about whom she says: Candy ends with his face turned to the wall, shutting them out. Without Lennie, George cannot envision himself carrying on, and he realises that the dream was never really possible. George and Lennie return to it to hide - and to die.

The snake is eaten. Although he can instruct Lennie on what to do and not do, and although he perceives the danger posed by Curley's wife, he cannot be with Lennie every hour of every day and, therefore, cannot truly protect Lennie from himself.

Despite its beauty it will not sustain life. There is a definite, if invisible, line between Crooks and the other ranch hands drawn due to race. Loneliness is a recurrent theme in the novel. One barrier is based on gender: While Curley's wife is always looking for attention, Curley's jealousy causes How does steinbeck present the lives the hands to stay away from her.

Hearing this, suddenly Candy sits up and offers the money that can make it real. JPS Comments The candidate does not go into a great deal of depth or detail concerning the wider themes and ideas of the novel.

This is an ideal ranch community of friendship, self-sufficiency and hope. Part B In the rest of the novella Steinbeck presents the ranch workers in a number of ways; not only are they lonely, but racist is another way they are portrayed.

Hence, he must rely on George to protect him. The decor of the bunkhouse is very plain conveying the inhabitants' way of life as well as how they view their 'home'.

What view of life on the ranch does Steinbeck present and envelop in Of Mice and Men?

Evidence George said softly, —I think I knowed from the very first. The bunkhouse is a male world, where women are not to be trusted. If one breaks down, you can always get another one.

Evidence [Candy] said miserably, You seen what they done to my dog tonight? This represents the hopelessness of men like them. This is what keeps both of the characters motivated throughout the novel.

This is never more apparent than when Curley's wife threatens to have him lynched. In my opinion, as a reader, you come to realise life as a ranch worker, especially in the s with the dust bowl and depression was a difficult life.

When George talks about the dream ranch Lennie gets really excited about it even though he has heard it a thousand times. If one breaks down, you can always get another one. At the beginning of chapter 2, Steinbeck describes the interior of the bunkhouse.

As they were farm-men and known for being masculine, they would carry out violent acts for the sake of satisfaction. During the time of The Great Depression many people packed up their families and headed for LA as that seemed to be the best place to go.

Question 21 Part a How does Steinbeck use details in this passage pp. Powerlessness Steinbeck's characters are often the underdogs, and he shows compassion toward them throughout the body of his writings.

How Does of Mice and Men Present the Life of a Migrant Worker

Hell of a nice fella. As the sole black man on the ranch, he is isolated from the others, and, in ways that the others are not, subject to their whim. They all fight against their isolation in whatever way they can. Without the ability to work, Candy is powerless in ways that are literarl and figurative.

During the Great Depression most men were forced to move around on their own to make money to send home to their families. Readers are introduced to the lives of itinerant workers in America during the Great Depression.

In the New World, land and property have already been divided: In Of Mice and Men, Steinbeck explores dreams through: As the only black man on the ranch, he is not allowed into the bunkhouse with the others, and he does not associate with them.How does Steinbeck present the ranch community in Of Mice and Men?

Value of Work and Working Men in Of Mice and Men for GCSE and IGCSE kaleiseminari.com The natural location is also used to suggest the circular nature of the men’s lives. Readers are introduced to the lives of itinerant workers in America during the Great Depression.

Steinbeck uses setting to describe itinerant workers’ lives such as “small square windows” – a symbolism of the prison-like working conditions of a farmhand worker. In the ending of the story, Steinbeck presents the culture of migrant workers from Carslon's last line "Now what the hell ya suppose is eatin' them two guys?", because migrant workers were lonely and self-centered, so wouldn't necessarily understand other's emotions.

How does Steinbeck use details in this passage (pp) to present the bunkhouse and its inhabitants? and then Part (b) In the rest of the novel, how does Steinbeck present the lives of ranch workers at that time? Get an answer for 'In Of Mice and Men, how does Steinbeck present the lives of the workers on the ranch?' and find homework help for.

Steinbeck reinforces the theme of loneliness in subtle and not so subtle ways. In the vicinity of the ranch, for example, is the town of Soledad.

How does Steinbeck present the life of an itinerant worker at the beginning of the novel?

The town's name, not accidentally, means "solitude" or "alone.".

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How does steinbeck present the lives
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